Frank Carter and the Rattlesnakes have announced their new album, End of Suffering, which is out in May.  They gave fans a preview of what to expect at Peddler in Sheffield. We were lucky enough to catch Dean Richardson (guitar) and Frank Carter (vocals) in their tour-bus for some quick questions.

Feeling all prepared for the show tonight?

Frank: No.

Dean: No? I am!

Frank: No, haha. We have a playlist to get in the mood, but we normally also have a list of things we kind of need to do. Dean always goes to the gym without fail, I try to go climbing

What’s on the getting-in-the-mood-playlist?

Frank: All sorts of things: everything from Brockhampton to Denzel Curry, a bit of the Neighbourhood. Dean: Basically just anything we listen to at the time.

Frank: Not a lot of rock, usually. Sometimes a bit of Black Keys, a bit of Queens of the Stone Age. Speaking of Queens of the Stone Age, what was it like to work with Alan Moulder?

Frank: He made albums in the 90s that literally changed my life. So, for me, he is the guy.

This album is called the End of Suffering, which is the Buddhist term for Enlightenment. Does that mean a lot to you and as a band?

Frank: It does to me, yeah. When you hear those words it sounds so final. It sounds quite brutal, but when you put it together and read back the sentence to yourself it is ultimately very hopeful and beautiful. And I think that is what we make: we make an album that is quite savage, quite brutal in places, but ultimately the undercurrent of the whole thing is one of hope.  We are always looking for little sparks of magic. It just comes together really quickly and it is really beautiful or powerful. It sounds silly, but we just constantly watch until a little bit of magic happens and then we follow that.

In your previous interviews, you have always been very open about your mental health. Has anyone inspired you in doing so?

Frank: Dean inspired me massively to talk more about it. I had a therapist who I would talk to, but a lot of the time I would come out of my therapy and call him for two hours to help me process things. So, it has definitely been inspired by the closest people around me. They gave me the confidence to speak up. I think one of the biggest fears of a human being is that of embarrassment. That is why I think a lot of men do not speak up: they are afraid of embarrassing themselves in front of their strong male friends, you know, but there is a huge amount of strength in being vulnerable.

Dean: Frank has taught me pretty much everything I know about speaking about my emotions. We spend a lot of time together. When we first started we would talk about music all the time, but now we spend so much time talking about what is actually going on in our lives as well. We have a much healthier relationship.

Frank: Because of that, our music is better too. The goal now is to convince more men to join the crusade of talking.

Is that going to change within this generation?

Frank: I am going to try my hardest!

Dean: I think it is changing. When you look at people younger than us, it is different for them already. That is one of the positive things the internet does – it can speed up things. Messages spread way quicker and people learn from that. So, I am hopeful. We are in an exciting point of history.

What do you think your generation will be remembered for?

Frank: Instagram, haha! And some seriously bad decisions.

Dean: Politically, we are in the maddest time. It seems to be the extreme left against the extreme right whilst all of the working together is gone. That has to be something to look back on. I think we are at a breaking point and something needs to change.

Frank: This interview is getting deep. These are important conversations.

Dean: Yeah, it is not all bad.  It is easy to blame social media for certain problems, rather than seeing it as a platform where people actually express their problems that we can use to reach out to people. Before social media, Smash Hits would make people feel insecure instead of Instagram. There have always been issues.

Image: Stefan Brending

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